Review #12 Street Samurai Catalog (RS) +

Greetings readers

You will all notice the little plus sign out there on the title of this one, well that is because I am doing a little pitching for another blog here. My wife has started up a DIY blog for creating Steampunk items for home decorating. GO HERE. I think its only fair to try and steer people her way since she has asked me to do a game review on her blog. It is not my usual RPG game fare though, it is a table top game called Crimson Skies. Some may remember the Xbox game with the same title, or have read some of the game novels, but the table top game was done on a license from Microsoft by WizKidz. I know that table top games are usually the venue of my friend Dan the RPG man over at Dan on Games, but I just had to go ahead with it.

Now with that bit of shameless promotion out of the way, lets get to the reason you are really here, and that is my latest review.

The Street Samurai Catalog is a supplement for the first edition of the Shadowrun game published back in 1989. Shadowrun is a rather unique game due to the fact that it very successfully mixes Urban Fantasy and Cyberpunk into a very dark and fascinating world. It is also unique because even though it has been owned by several hands, since its inception in 1989 (see the link to wiki for a fair description of how it has changed hands) the game has run a series of ongoing story lines in meta plots that have progressed the world from 2050 to 2079. The rules system is a little complex when it comes to combat, and driving but overall it has been a lot of fun to stick with.

Ok so given that the game has been around for over twenty five years, why am I doing a review about a game supplement that came out in the first year of its production of the first edition? Well that is because this was the very first add on that I picked up for Shadowrun. The Grimoire was the second. It took me a while to really find the role I liked to play in this game setting but that is something that can be covered in another review or rant.

Considering that I had started playing RPG’s in the 70’s I had really gotten used to the idea that a supplement book would be just a stack of information about new gear. Maybe a few new rules and if I was lucky maybe an adventure in the back. On flipping through the book the very first time though I was caught off guard. There was not a lot of new stuff in the book. I mean for a 116 page book that I was going to drop twelve bucks on, I was really thinking that there should be more than one new item per page. Now then I will say this was back in the days when I was fairly new to FASA games publications. Only having played Battletech for a few years and mostly in a home brew kinda way, their tendency to add story and color elements to just about everything they do was something I had not completely caught on to yet. So I took a closer look at what they had offered. Yeah there is some cool gear here, and some new rules that made the items in the book a serious threat, or a serious joke.

What really caught me though was the color commentary by characters who were supposedly reading this book as an article posted online. It reminded me of some of the BBS sites that I had been introduced to. If you really think about it 1989, we were still a few years off from seeing the AOL revolution and the internet becoming a big thing. Thank you internet. And yet here was this book giving me the idea that there would be forums online where you could not only connect but to comment on things you were seeing. And even if people did not agree with you, you still had basic credibility because you were smart enough and skilled enough to get to this place online and talk about whatever you were looking into. But the banter that developed between characters, and the way they would evolve over the years became damned impressive. However that was to come, right at the moment I decided that yeah, this was worth my twelve bucks, this was how the future was going to look. And it looked like fun.

The book itself has entries on about ninety weapons, armor, vehicle and cyber options. Commentary on about half of them. Several pages of extra rules, Street Samurai character templates, reference sheets and character sheets.

Now then what is really funny about this, is that at the time this game came out, I was not convinced that I would play it. I was so hooked on supers (still am really) and fantasy settings that I just could not get into Shadowrun that much. I thought it was a cool idea sure. But I talked down about it almost as much as I talked up about it. When this book came out though, I decided that the Shadowrun world was mine, and I did not want to share it. So I sort of purposefully spiked the Shadowrun game I was in at the time by mocking the GM relentlessly (not that he didn’t need mocking) and trying to start up a game of my own (failed ohhh so badly). But again thats another story.

So how does this game stack up when I give it the numbers?

Fluff – 5/5 – This is going to be another moment when folks say… ‘Wait another supplement with a 5/5 in fluff, what the hell?’ And before I tell you to go piss in someone else’s corn flakes, let me tell you this. EVERY SINGLE ITEM that they are adding in this supplement, weapons, armor, cyber and toys gets its own art. Each one gets its own little bit of advertising like you would see in a catalog and over half of them have additional color commentary. Trust me the fluff is strong with this one.

Crunch – 2/5 – So you have to take this score in context a bit. This is a supplement made using the very first edition rules for a new game. In years to come it got easier and some of the rules got less unwieldy. But because of the changes in the rules structure it is a challenge to even import these items into the current edition of the game.

Mod – 1/5 – This is really an issue for Shadowrun over all up until the fourth edition. Due to rules complexity it is really easy to over power something by making very small seeming adjustments. And just as easy to make something completely useless. Actually there are a couple items in the book that really are useless. They sort of did that as a joke on themselves and even added color commentary that says “Wonderful. Now I can flatten light ammo against body armor faster than ever before.”

Fun – 4/5 – Ok so the rules hurt, and the chance to make things work or alter them is slim. But it is still a lot of fun. And it got more so as time went on and you could see the commentators appear in more and more supplements and see how they grew. The toys were fun to play with and it made a real impact on how I looked at games and what they could be. So yeah while I rate the fun high I am not going to max it out.

Overall – 12/20 – Ok so this is one of my lower overall scores. I figure I will have even worse in the future. With a score like this, is it worth looking into? I would say so if you like classic Shadowrun, have an obsessive need to go all pokemon on your RPG books and have to collect them all, or think that the art and comments might give you ideas. This is not going to be a book for everyone. Not even everyone who is a Shadowrun fan. But it is special to me and so I still say take a look and decide for yourself.

Well thats it for this time on my own blog. Not sure when my write up for Crimson Skies will appear on my wifes blog but it is something you can look forward to.

Now gimme the dice, got to see what the odds are that I will appear in other blogs and how much light ammo it will take to get back out of them.

Play safe and have fun folks.

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