Character Building 102 – Creating a Framework

Hey there readers.

So in my last character building entry I talked a bit about the kind of roleplayers I have experience with. And I also spent a little time talking about the components of a character.

So what the monkey am I talking about when I say creating a framework?

Well when I am talking about a framework I am talking about putting the six elements that I talked about in the first post (Stats, Power, Kit, Personality, Story, and Appearance) into a semblance of order so that you can build like you want to build, or your game needs you to build in.

A quick example would be the following.

If I am a power gamer then I would be looking at a framework that would be

  1. Stats
  2. Power
  3. Kit
  4. Anything else.

Simple.

Now then for myself I like having a complete character with all of the elements that I mentioned. However I do not have a single framework that I use. I set myself up based on if I am using a level based game or a point based game. The reason for that is that when I am doing a level based game, they are bye and large set up for random stat generation. With that in mind I know that I cannot really come up with a story until I get my stats in place and see how they would work. When I am playing a point based game I can get a story and build the character to fit.

So my usual frameworks look like this..

Point based

  1. Personality
  2. Story
  3. Appearance
  4. Stats
  5. Power
  6. Kit

Level based

  1. Stats
  2. Power
  3. Personality
  4. Story
  5. Kit
  6. Appearance

Now then, I can already hear folks asking, ‘Why do you need a story?’

The answer to that is, simple yet not so simple.

With a character story you know more about your character. You know where they came from, how they developed their personality, if any element in their kit is something of importance.

Now then this does not mean you need to develop a 300 page novel about your characters background. It can be a simple paragraph.

For example –

**************

Julian the Swift was born to a wealthy family in one of the largest human cities in the kingdom. He was the last of six children and as such the family had no plans for him, and socially no real need for him. So he was left to his own devices as much as possible to keep him out from under foot. By age 10 he had decided that attention from his family was the last thing that he wanted, and that the street people held much more interesting lives. He fell in with criminals by the age of 12, and his mentor, Old Spider, gifted him with a set of masterwork thieves tools for his 13th birthday to celebrate his first solo job for the Thieves Guild. He would still spend holidays with his family, and even attend parties, mostly to garner information on who the Guild could hit and who they couldn’t. Unfortunately at age 19 he was caught in the act of stealing from one of his families friends and has been on the run since. He would still love to work with Old Spider and the guild, but until he can come up with a cover identity and some gold of his own going back to that city is not really an option.

**************

In that short bit of writing I have set up a background, given some serious motivations, and even hinted at the characters personality. From this you might expect a few stats to be high, and maybe a few others low. You have an idea as to where and how he might have developed skills and other abilities that may not usually seem to be part of a specific class. You know some of the kit that he carries and why it might be important in the game. You also have NPCs that a GM can run with to add to the overall game. I mean what happens when someone catches up to this character with a message saying that Old Spider is dead, or that his elder brothers have died and now he is the heir to the family estate?

Am I saying that background is all important?

No. What I am saying is that it is something that is frequently missed and is as important as everything else in a character.

The number of gamers that I know who can actually run a background on the fly is pretty high. Strangely enough. And so many of them fill in things as needed without a framework like the ones that I use. Being a bit of a control freak and a story teller myself I have a tendency to not even try to do it on the fly. I would rather have a story than not. I would rather have it well before game than not.

For the rest of the world other systems or lack there of may make sense. They may even work. For me not so much.

Personality is also something that most players will initially kind of skip over. They have a tendency to play themselves. I am sooooooo guilty of that it beggars the mind. The reason for this is because it can be hard to play another personality. You dont want to think like someone else. You just want to use your mind and escape reality for a while and dive into another. And that is cool. As long as your character supports it.

I mean if you are constantly drunk, more than a little violent, and have a moral compass with a broken needle… you really should not take that personality into playing a Paladin. If you are a righteous and moral being who cannot stand the idea that anyone should get away with anything, you likely shouldnt play a thief as yourself. You get the idea. If you are going to take your own personality into the game, you should build accordingly and so that should likely be on the top of your framework.

Now then article three in this will be about getting people to develop complete characters. How you can do it as a GM, and how as a player you can get others to do so in your group.

Ok so that should give you something to think about for a bit 🙂 Hope you enjoy.

Now gimme the dice, I need to see how many alternate personalities this character has… hmmm where is that d5000?

  1. #1 by dantherpgman on May 6, 2019 - 5:51 am

    I mean if you are constantly drunk, more than a little violent, and have a moral compass with a broken needle… you really should not take that personality into playing a Paladin.

    I see what you did there.

    I love the example you put out there, because as you said it shows you don’t have to spend a million hours or write a huge novel. Just a paragraph or two goes a long way. Very nice.

    Like

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