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Should it blend?

Ok so anyone who remembers the old “Will it Blend?” add campaign online for a certain blender company will likely be asking why I dont have a blender image on here… well it looks like they still have a trademark for the campaign and so I want to avoid it as much as possible…. heh.

So what is this question about?

Well back in the 90’s a writer named Deird’re Brooks (hope I got your name right, I have seen it spelled three ways) wrote a series of articles in White Wolf Magazine under the heading of World of Future Darkness. It spanned issues 36 – 38 of the magazine and it was all about blending Cyberpunk 2020 in to the World of Darkness. Many people that I was gaming with at the time called the setting Cyber-Fang. The rules were fairly easy to mix, and it worked well. But in the end it never really seemed to catch on.

Several years later a few game designers got together and officially put the Hero System (Champions) and the Interlock System (Cyberpunk 2020 and others) into a new game engine they called Fuzion. It is not a bad system revision. It has a nice mix of both systems but is not really as solid as either one is on its own.

I am sure that these are not the only cases where blending of game systems has happened. I am sure that folks do it all the time. And anyone who knows me at all will know that I blend genre’s mercilessly.

But here is the real question… Should game engines be blended?

Each game engine has been made to fit a purpose. Not every engine can do everything well. Most only do two or three things really well.

So I ask should it blend? Or should we be looking to update game engines? Revise and repair them… or is blending the better way to evolve game engines?

Ok so gimme the dice… I need to see if I can mix a d4 and a d12… hmmm

 

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Game Review #36 Gargoyles : The Vigil

Ok so feeling a bit better and now for something a little different.

Back in 1994 Disney put out a cartoon that I would love forever. Gargoyles. At the same time I was playing a lot of World of Darkness (WOD) by White Wolf. And some time after 1996 someone pointed me to a file they found online called Gargoyles : The Vigil. The author is listed as one Lee Garvin, who makes it very clear in his second edition PDF of the game that neither Disney, nor White Wolf endorsed this creation.

Currently the only place I can find this work is on file sharing locations like Scribed. Since it is totally fan made I see no issue in downloading it.

Now then you should not confuse this with the official White Wolf WOD supplement called Gargoyles. That official book has nothing to do with the animated series and in my opinion is one of the worst additions to the WOD anyone has made. It just… ungh… no… no bad reviews.

Anyway, Gargoyles : The Vigil takes the Disney animated series and drops it right into the WOD. Basically making the Gargoyles the natural enemy of vampires, occasional allies of the were creatures, and known to the other supernatural entities in WOD, but still having totally their own flavor.

The document that Lee Garvin put together, even in its slightly prettier second edition is not all that well edited. And it leaves some serious gaps in describing the rules to add. However when I took a look at copyright law I found out there is a little genius in how it was made. Turns out that fan use usually means that you can use a certain percentage of material before you start hitting infringement territory. That is as long as you do not seek to profit from it. It has something to do with the same reasons that authors can mention real companies in their books without permission. As long as you do not defame the name, use too much about them, and, well there are a few other loop holes. But the gist of it is that Lee Garvin rode that line right to the edge so that neither Disney nor White Wolf could do too much. At least, that is if I got all that information right. However it goes that would explain why it is a little hard to find and not the best edit in the history of fan material.

On the plus side, I think it really catches the feel of the animated series. And the rules make the characters possibilities fit well with any WOD campaign, from Hunters up through all of the mains.

I know a lot of folks over the years have tried to put together RPG supplements and games for Gargoyles, and a lot of folks have felt disjointed in the results. While the editing and the self defense of not using EVERYTHING in either WOD or the animated series makes it a little bit of a challenge to use right out of the gate, I, as a fan, think that it is worth the effort to get it going.

Ok so I am still trying to roll quickly and keep working to feel better so this is not going to be a long review. Lets get to the numbers…

Overall Fluff 1/5 – There is not much. They could have used other fan art and images to keep from hitting copyright issues, but there really is no art. There are quotes from the series, and a little bit of fluff to place the game setting. Overall this is the biggest disappointment in the game, but also the most understandable if you dont want to be sued.

Overall Crunch 3/5 – The rules variants that the author came up with work really well. It is kind of amazing how simply the Gargoyles characters can fit into WOD and how easy it is to create brand new ones that just rock. And yes that should be a bad pun 😛

Overall Mod 4/5 – As easy to mod as any other WOD title.

Overall Fun 5/5 – I am a fan of both WOD (the original anyway) and Gargoyles (RULE THE NIGHT FOREVER!!!!) so yeah I think its fun.

Total Score 13/20 – A rather weak score, but still, I love it. Can I recommend it. Yes. Is it for everyone, no.

Ok so I gotta run…

So gimme the dice, I gotta see if Goliath can keep up in high winds 🙂

 

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Weak Sauce

Hey there readers.

Week two of not being in the best form, so I am still going to keep a low profile and try to get a new review out next week. I was pondering something like Tales from the Floating Vagabond, or maybe Hellas. You will note a lack of a link on Hellas, that is because the only link I could offer would be to the publisher or a place that is selling it. Since I try to avoid those… no link… just Google Hellas RPG yourself 😛

Be nice out there folks and play hard.

Now gimme the dice, I need to see if there is a saving throw against new game purchase.

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Tiny Post

Hey all

I am not feeling well and so this will be just a quick note to say hi and to say I will try to get a real post out next week. However there are a lot of things going on for me and the wife next week so it may not be possible. If not, there will at least be another tiny post.

Be well, play hard and gimme the dice, I gotta see if mixing meds will help.

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Game Review #35 Rifts 1st Edition (G)

Hey there everyone

So while I have reviewed multiple products from Palladium Books before, and I know that in the last year there have been a lot more blow outs regarding the company and its owner Kevin Siembieda. I am not going to rehash that at all though. This post is about the first edition of the most ambitious setting I have ever seen. Rifts.

So let me say I first found this game the year it came out. I was interested right off the bat because after Shadowrun came out the year before, and in my mind blew the doors off of putting Fantasy and Cyberpunk together into a single setting, I wanted to see what one of my favorite publishers, the folks who had brought me Heroes Unlimited, TMNT and other Strangeness and Robotech could do with a setting that essentially mixed… everything… together in one place.

I wanted to be tough on them, to really put the pressure on to make sure they kept up the quality of settings I had seen them do, and license. I gave up on that completely when I got to the RCC (Racial Character Class) section and found that you could start the game playing a dragon. And that while dragons generally preferred not to get cybered up, you could. And they had natural magic. And… well yeah… so…

Anyway they had a ton of other interesting classes. The original book had humans, dragons, psychics and ‘dog boys’ as the races you could play. And if you were human you could pick an OCC (Occupational Character Class) to go with your race.

Your initial setting is on a post apocalypse Earth. Where things had gone high tech. There was a lot of cool gear and toys. Humans got stupid and went WW3 on each other. Massive death toll on just the right time pulled all the psychic energy into the worlds ley lines and they went nuts. Magic returned to the world, the ley lines turned into Rifts bringing things from multiple different dimensions and worlds to Earth. Death toll rises. Things lock into place and humanity has been shattered. Three hundred years or so later a small human empire is up and running in the midwest using Nazi like tactics to get folks under their thumb. And in the setting at the moment the first book came out you could either be a part of the empire, our choose to be outside it.

Later books would expand things, a lot… no really… a lot. I wont go into detail but add in books about parts of Earth, other dimensions, lists of deities (yeah they are wandering around too), alien parts salesmen and all sorts of other stuff and the whole thing gets freakin’ huge. Unfortunately all that growth comes with an epidemic of power creep. However that is not the point of this review.

One of the things that really drew me in was that fact that this setting was in the same rules as every other Palladium Books game I had played. And they stated right in the book that they were going to put out a supplemental book that would tell you how to bring over every other type of character and make it work. So of course the first thing that I did with a game group was to put together a mission in which the TMNT stole the SDF-1 and tried to raid the capitol of that burgeoning new human empire with the assistance of a few super humans and more than a few cybernetic spies. Yeahhh. Thats the kinda stuff this setting lets you get away with.

Now the game itself is far from perfect. My current copy of the original rule book is eighth printing and it still has a ton of editorial errors. The art is the usual Palladium mixed batch where you may have one or two artists that are pretty good, but the cover is the only art really worth drooling over (save for licensed titles and some of the most recent books they have done when they finally got new art teams and the owner quit trying his hand at art from time to time).

My biggest issue with the game is that the leveling system calls back to original D&D, with that poor elf who does elf things. And the fact that you cannot change classes at any point other than to just clear everything you have learned and take on a new roll. So you start at ground level all over again despite how ever long you have been playing. This type of level system does have its benefits, and it can keep a player from over reaching and trying to become a dragon with a borg aspect who pilots giant robots and has made magical pacts to become… ohhhh you get it. If the rules wont let you do it it stops things from getting too far out of control unless you make exceptions and get into power creep (cough cough later books). Even though it would be ten years before we would see D&D 3rd edition and get a really solid look at what you can do slipping between classes ‘officially’, there have been examples for years of a controlled method of mixing rolls so that players can build what they can imagine without getting too far out of control.

Even with its built in imperfections this game has been an inspiration to me for a long time. I love the potential in crossing genres. And while there were other game engines like the Hero System and GURPS that set you up to be able to do EVERYTHING in one game engine. This is the first setting that I became aware of that actually put EVERYTHING in one place from the beginning.

Ok so lets look at the numbers…

Overall Fluff 4/5 – There is enough background info here and in both editorial and character voices that the setting really comes to life. The art helps a little when it can avoid being distracting. There are so many bread crumbs dropped that ties this setting into everything else that Palladium Books published that you cant help but feel things coming together are you read.

Overall Crunch 4/5 – Standard Palladium Books rules. It is a good system if you accept its limits and the things that it wont let you do. If you take it on its own the rules are comprehensive and cover just about anything you can imagine.

Overall Mod 3/5 – Adding things and subtracting things is about the best you can hope for. However that adding and subtracting allows for bringing in things from so many other settings it is kind of hard not to say you can mod it.

Overall Fun 4/5 – I enjoy it a lot. I occasionally have moments where I want to mix classes and it frustrates the crud out of me until I remember where I put my house rules to blend OCC and even RCC. But then I have to find it again and the realize I can do enough with the character I have and … then I am back to having fun 🙂

Total Score 15/20 – Not a bad score overall. If you can get past all the current hullabaloo about the company and the owner/author then you might want to consider this game if you like the mixing of genre. If you do I would recommend going first ed over the later versions due to the fact the book changed to try and compensate for the power creep in its other books and made some changes that hampered some of the choices you could make regarding the character types you could play.

Ok so thats it… my thoughts and opinions. Run with it or dont its up to you 🙂

Now gimme the dice, I gotta see how much more power creep we can work with… hmmm how did a 924 get on my d20…

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Game Review #33 CM4 Earthshaker (M)

Ok so this review has a bit of a twisted origin, but still flashes us back into the 80’s.

The first time I saw this module (CM4 Earthshaker), for a version of Basic D&D I never got into until the 2000’s called The Companion Rules,  sitting in a local book store I knew I had to have it. GIANT FREAKING ROBOT! It was the mid 80’s and I had only recently discovered anime. Voltron, Robotech, and so many others with giant robots. I had to know more.

What I learned did not really help me enjoy… much… when it came to giant robots. Less so for D&D. It also put the capstone on my long lived hatred of all things gnome. However it did cement for me the idea that cross genre stories, adventures and setting could be done. IF they were done right. Looking back at the module today it feels more like an attempt to get players to really feel what it is like to run a kingdom when there is a huge potential disaster coming your way. But this one has an element of the disaster that you can fight directly. It also feels a LOT more like steampunk than anything else. I still hate the gnomes though.

This module also started me asking the questions again regarding the limits on character levels that you see in D&D, the limits on roles per race, and how much better AD&D was because while you still had level limits based on race (which everyone I knew tossed right out the window) it was better than having to have a conversation like…

“So what are you?”

“An elf.”

“And what do you do?”

“Elf things.”

“No I mean what is your job?”

“I am an elf.”

“No I get that I can see the ears… I mean what do you do? I am a Cleric, I use holy magic.”

“No you dont get it… Elves, Dwarves, Halflings (because Hobbits are under another copyright) we dont get careers… I am an ELF, that is my race, my job, my fate… I can only do ELF things… and I cant advance like you do… dont you see!!!”

“I…ummmm… wow….unhhh”

(uncontrolled sobbing)

Yeah, so moving on lets see what the numbers look like before that elf gets back…

 

Overall Fluff 2/5 – Like most early modules for D&D of any version, the fluff is weak. Cool cover art by a D&D legend helps, but that can only take you so far.

Overall Crunch 5/5 – This is where this really shines. The added rules to help you solve problems for a large area/kingdom really can give you a grip on scale, even though they only take up about half a page. The rules for supersized constructs, they rock. hard to imagine it taking several hundred beings working together to make it work, but hey, that is the steampunk way.

Overall Mod 2/5 – Ok so here is a big challenge. You cannot really scale this to lower levels. You cannot really alter a lot of the material. You can however replicate it and make a giant steampunk robot setting with it. So I still have to give it some points.

Overall Fun 3/5 – I may not have learned much but it allowed me to destroy a full tribe of gnomes while taking a giant steam powered robot off their hands and foil some villains and use the robot to set up a new version of the Colossus of Rhodes.

Total Score 12/20 – Not the best module ever. However it does have some nifty little things that you can use to build up a campaign, or just toss a wrench into the day of any group of heroes you might know.

So there it is… look it up, toss it out, whatever works for you.

Now gimme the dice… I need to see if I can roll up a job for that elf so he will stop crying.

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Monster Rights Activism

Yeah ok so this one is a bit odd. But a conversation with my wife got me thinking about this the other day and I wanted to share.

In games, and fiction, we have this long history of establishing a race or species as being evil. And tons of authors and designers end up using the same races. Making them evil over and over again.

On some rare occasions someone will take a race and change things up a bit. Like when Privateer Press created Iron Kingdoms, goblins were a character race up front and had a part of the main-stream culture all their own. Other games have usually settled for adding a supplemental book that says something like ‘Yeah all these is usually monsters, but here is how you can play one. Just be ready to be killed as soon as you go into a city.’

My issue with all this comes from the question, are they really evil or do they just have a culture the writers don’t like?

I mean if you think about it really. If you are a goblin living in the forest with your clan, you and your people have never done anything to any other creature. Because you are all devout vegans and the forest gives you everything you could need. And along comes a group of non goblins. They cry out that goblins are evil and kill everyone in the clan.

Or what if you happen to be a Minotaur that spent forty years learning structural engineering and site planning. All the while working as a body guard and in general labor so you could afford to buy some land and build a labyrinth all to fulfill your personal dream of making something that people could enjoy. When you are doing your final walk through a group of beings comes marching through your pride and joy and as soon as they spot you, instead of letting you tell them about the way you made it and the intricacies of the patterns you created, they scream out that Minotaur are evil and kill you. (I think a realtor or property developer is actually behind this one, knew the Minotaur would never sell, and wanted to have an exclusive property to sell)

I mean after a few years of this sort of unfriendly behavior I would think that all of these other races would start banding together for self defense. Maybe even becoming the force for evil that others are calling them just so they can have a chance to have a life on their own.

You can roll it up under any context you like… but it still looks more like the “heroes” are the evil ones to me.

Lets try this example. The god that gave you your holy writ tells you and your people that while the ‘good’ gods created you and yours, the ‘evil’ gods created these other races and that makes them bad so you should go and kill them. I would have to ask someone in this instance do you really know what is going on between these gods? I mean they tell you their history and you take that on ‘faith’ and run with it and assume you are the good guy. How do you know the ‘evil’ god did not just say no to a night of Netflix and chill with the ‘good’ god, and this is how the ‘good’ god gets their revenge? Getting all of their little minions to destroy everything the ‘evil’ god created. I mean really, who is the evil one there?

I know, I know, shades of grey, the world is dark enough, fantasy lets us get past the weirdness and gives us black and white so we can feel good about slaughtering something evil and not having to worry about consequences.

I will be the first to admit that it is really nice to be able to just step back and say, ‘Yup, that’s an orc so we can kill it.’ It makes things so easy. You can pick something make it bad and everyone can point at it and say it is responsible for all your ills. But I am wondering if anyone really has the nerve to build something from the ground up that asks if we can be more than that.

Rifts came close. Humans, Dogboys, and Dragons right off the bat. Magic and psychic powers vs technology. Open minds against ‘the right way to do things’. However they did their best to say that Humans were the bad guys in that one and that any human that was not part of the problem had to prove themselves a lot. Which still really gave us a ‘bad guy’ it just turned the table on species more than anything.

I seriously think we can come up with something that does it better.

If anyone knows of one let me know I would love to check it out.

Until then I will continue to fight for monster rights.

Now gimme the dice, I need to see what two goblins and an octopus priest walking into a bar looks like.

 

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Game Review #32 Marvel Super Heroes – Advanced – TSR(G)

Hello Readers

So this review is a flashback to 1984 and 1986. Back in 1984 TSR published the first licensed superhero RPG, Marvel Super Heroes. Well it is the first as far as I know. DC Heroes from Mayfair came out in 1985 and Palladium Books published their Justice Machine book (for Heroes Unlimited) the same year. I cannot find any others that came out at the same time. Superhero 2044 was the first in super hero games overall (1977). So while Champions (Iron Crown Enterprises/Hero Games 1981) and Villains and Vigilantes (Fantasy Games Unlimited 1979) also had comics associated with them, those comics were spin-offs of the game and not what inspired the game in the first place.

Now then over the years there have been other Marvel RPGs. Heck TSR even did another game using their SAGA system  for Marvel Super Heroes Adventure Game in 1998. (Articles on numbers 3 and 4 are in the links on the numbers) And then there was the 250 Point Project (now defunct and only remnants and links remain on the original Tripod web page – visit and follow at your own risk) which was an effort to convert famous characters in comic books into starter characters in Champions which makes it an unofficial Marvel RPG.

All of which tells me that folks really want to play RPG’s in the Marvel Comics Universe. And likely, regardless of a published system just for the setting or not, those folks will continue to find a way.

Now then for myself, I got into the game in the first edition in 1984. Drug a good friend into playing it with me, and while there were some things that made no sense what so ever (the use of Areas to measure distance and an Area was very irregular on the maps, and that base speed is never mentioned, oh and lest I forget the fact that you can loose more Karma [the exp system] for missing a charity event that you could gain by stopping a crime in progress) made for some pretty messy game sessions when we first started out. The second big hit came when we realized that no mater what you did you could never make a character that would be equal to any of your favorite characters, it kinda got shelved for a while. When I got my hands on the 1986 Advance version of the game, it had a lot more options. Strangely the Karma and Area issues were still there (to be honest the Area issue was reduced by having some standardized spacing on most of the new maps but it was still not a grid or the like), but they were softened by having a lot more options for building characters and the chance to actually make something that could go toe to toe with many of your personal favorites. No one could take on Galactus on their own, but hey, you have to have limits.

Something that made the game a lot of fun for me other than being able to make so many characters was the overall mechanic for action resolution. When I was playing regularly I would always call it the FASERIP (acronym of sorts for the game stats) chart.

FASERIP Results

The chart shown here is from the advanced game. The basic one had less to it. Overall the idea is to roll high on a percentile die. You want to be in the red. Green and Yellow are ok. And White is bad. And you get the number you need to roll by looking at the value you have… smeg ok let me just give you a sample. Hero has Monstrous Strength and is trying to lift something heavy. The object has a weight that is above Monstrous so his roll to lift it will move down two columns. So now he has to roll on the Incredible column. Hero wants to lift it over his head and throw it. GM says that means he needs a Yellow roll if he is going to throw it right away, Red if he wants to hold it and actually aim before he throws. Green means he can pick it up but wont be able to toss it, and White means he strains something. So when rolling a d100 player for Hero needs to roll a 61 or higher to do what he wants. And if he rolls a 30 or less then he will hurt himself.

This same type of game engine was used for action resolution in the 3rd edition of Gamma World (TSR 1986) and the overall mechanic looks like it might currently be held by Ronin Arts, for use in their Four Color RPG. However Ronin Arts has not published anything since 2015 and there are several other publishers putting out their material, so I am unsure what is really going on there.

Now then the reason I wanted to work this review with the Advanced version of the game is because it offered so many more details and options than in the Basic set. Even to the number of prepackaged characters there were more. Bigger better stronger. All of the above and then some. The Advanced version really did level up the game.

So was it fun to play, yeah it was, and if you wanted to roll up a character just make sure you have expectations that you would not make someone equal to Thor right off the bat and you will be fine.

They published a lot of additional books that expanded on.. well… everything. And they did modules for two of the biggest events in Marvel history up to that point, the original Secret Wars, and Secret Wars 2. Overall you really only needed one additional book to take character creation over the top. And if you were happy running your favorite characters from the comics you would not even need to do that. Especially given how many characters they published in modules, supplements, and even in Dragon Magazine. You could be perfectly happy without ever getting a rules expansion.

So given the breakdowns above and the fact that I still collect the game and would love to find a group to play it with again, how do I rack up the numbers?

Overall Fluff 2/5 – Really there was very little fluff to it. The art was wicked cool, but everything was written from the perspective that you had read a lot of Marvel comics well before playing. At least in the core game. Supplements had more flavor and feel to them, but the core set relied heavily on the art for its fluff. And there was not really enough art to make up for that lack.

Overall Crunch 4/5 – The rules are surprisingly solid. Even with the flaws in things like Karma, and Areas and Movement, with some creativity they could all be worked around or ignored easily.

Overall Mod 3/5 – It was not easy to mod this system in to other genres. It could be done but it was not easy at all. You also had to mod the rules to make the EXP system something that would work well. And anyone who had played 1st edition knew that up front.

Overall Fun 4/5 – Ya know it is actually really fun for me to get my favorite heroes and villains to fight it out. And to be able to put them into impossible situations and get them out, or even fail on purpose so I can see characters I hate burn to ash… yeahhhh. And in the end I like the engine. Even if I have to tweak it a little to make it work completely.

Total Score 13/20 – Another one that does not get a mind blowingly high score. But also another game that with all its flaws and need for home brew adds that I would play again in a heartbeat. I cant be alone in that with the number of web sites you can find with people posting up to date versions of the characters, and expanding the material in the books. I mean if nothing else look at this versions longevity compared to anything else done for Marvel Comics in an RPG.

All right so in the end… YOU reader needs to take a look at this and see if it is right for you. If it is not then dont worry. Just move along and be happy.

All righty, so gimme the dice, I need to make a Feeble (see chart) attempt to think about dinner.

Have fun out there gaming all 🙂

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A Question of Taste

The image on this little rant is Kafka_Library by Gryphart on DeviantArt and is sort of my dream for a gaming library.

I was asked a couple weeks ago why I have so many positive reviews in my blog. Why do I not take shots at games I dont like? Why not get in and mix things up?

Well it all comes down really to a matter of taste. Do I want to waste my time being an @$$ online and just issuing nasty comments about stuff in an effort to drag in readers and get them to troll each other in the comments  to try and get my counters to spin? Or do I want to be someone who encourages people, appreciates the cool things and tries to give folks options for things they might find fun as well?

To be perfectly honest it is easy for me. I would rather put out things that I have positive comments on. I would rather get people psyched for gaming. I would really love to see everyone find the game for them and have them spread the good word to everyone they know so they can find a group to play that game and everyone can have a blast.

This is why you will see blog entries from me that are on games that I have mixed experience with, but you will never see one that I regret playing, or that I hate the rules for it.

There are a couple of people I know who cant seem to live without (as an old roommate said many times) crapping in others cornflakes, but given all the costs, challenges and issues that role playing games face in general, I would rather be a positive influence, even if it is only a small one. Better that then one of the @$$hats who only care about blog hits and getting others to talk about them, even if they are saying nothing good.

So short rant.

Sorry I have been absent but… life… I hope to be back soon, but no promises.

Now gimme the dice, I have to make a save vs work load. 🙂

 

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Game review #31 – C.L.O.W.N. (A)

Ok so I read over my previous posts and found that not only had I used #21 twice but I had left a couple unnumbered, so this gets things back on track.

C.L.O.W.N., one of my all time favorite adventure supplements for a game. This little module is proof that you can take a joke, and make it a threat. And take a threat and make it a joke. The book was originally published by Iron Crown Enterprises for Hero Games in the Champions 3rd edition game setting in 1989.

The organization is based off of, well, folks who are quite off their rockers by conventional standards. Their goal overall is to have fun and make the world laugh. Even the stuffed shirts that run governments and superheroes. Some of the epic pranks they get up to in the groups history section are… well… epic. The characters are sort of like… well… hell the best way I can describe them would be if you took Creeper and made him a bit more focused. Or if you took the power of the Hulk and gave it to a child who loves to play tag. The thing is they work so hard to not cause harm it makes them anti-heroes of the most comedic vein. As you can see in the attached image, the acronym C.L.O.W.N. stands for the Criminal Legion Of Wacky Non-conformists. And they do everything they can to live up to that name.

I found this adventure module shortly after it was published, but was unable to run anyone through an associated adventure for quite some time. It seems that after I unleashed a villain in a game called Bob as a Hunted for someones character (don’t ask) some players I was doing Champions games with at the time were a little hesitant to let me unleash something called C.L.O.W.N. on them. Overall not the worst call someone could make, because when I let the C.L.O.W.N.’s loose things did get very very odd. Anyway, I have kept this by my side for a long time, because even if you never use it directly it is a fun and inspirational read on how to use humorous characters and not have them steal the show or really detract from the overall flow of a game. The same cannot be said for Foxbat.

So while this feels really short… I can only jump into the numbers without giving away everything about the module, and I want you to reeeeeeeeead it 🙂

Overall Fluff 5/5 – The background, the characters, the small bits of art and even the car TeeHee (just read about it) all add so much flavor so well, that it is hard to see any bad points. And to really do that I would have to look at editing and I am not going there.

Overall Crunch 1/5 – Not too many new elements, and they purposefully bent some of their own rules to create a couple of things. So I really cant give much of a score here at all.

Overall Mod 3/5 – Soooooo… yeahhh… With all the other tools that I have I can mod these characters into any game I like. I can also use things like Champions 3D to pull up evil, darkly evil versions of the characters if I want to go that way. I can even add or take away just about anything as the main system is point based. The real challenge is does this type of humor fit every setting. No, not at all. So you have to be careful where you drop it, and how you mod it.

Overall Fun 5/5 – HAHAHAHAHAHAHAH 🙂 Your bloody right its fun 😉

Total Score 14/20 – Again for an all time fave its not a perfect score. But this is one of those things that you just have to run with. If you enjoy supers, and have a sense of humor plus a deep love of twisted nonsense, then you have to read this at the very least. Play it as you can.

Ok well thats it, time to shut down the system and beat the heat.

Play safe out there all.

Now gimme the dice, I need to see if there is a Master Mime in the house. 🙂

 

 

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